Atxaga at the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico: language is a rope in the dark

Euskara. Kultura. Mundura.

2014-12-04

"The literature brings out the infinite universe of the human soul; it makes the readers feel more free or less alone," said the Basque writer Bernardo Atxaga during the talk he held along with the journalist Javier Aranda Luna on Wednesday afternoon in one of the main rooms of the Palacio de Bellas Artes  in Mexico City, which this year celebrates its 80th anniversary. The event, held on the International Day of Euskera, is part of the extensive program of activities to promote Basque literature organized this week in Mexico by the Etxepare Basque Institute, with the support of the Delegation of Euskadi in the country.

The journalist and literary critic Javier Aranda Luna accompanied the author´s reflections on his work. "My books arise primarily from my two territories: the Basque Country and the second half of the twentieth century" noted Atxaga, who agreed when Aranda suggested that "the country is carried on the tongue"; "Language is a rope in the dark," said the writer.

Javier Aranda said that in the author´s latest novel, ´Days of Nevada´ the recovery of memory is essential, and Atxaga recognized that recovery involves a huge risk, as the memory must be combined with the physical universe, which is dramatically different . "In mental space, the time can jump from one place to another, it transits, whereas the physical time is linear." The author noted that in this novel "one of the poetic focus has been the emergence of the monster in everyday life." The writer also said that in "Days of Nevada", in which he describes his own world, like a window into the interior, there are reflections that he pointed out already on his youth notebooks and also in the novel "Obabakoak" written nearly 30 years ago. He added that the personal perspective is the starting point not only for the writer, but also for  the reader: the social, economic and political context of each reader influences the approach to a work, hence the reception of the same literary work in each country is different.

The conference was attended by Mari Jose Olaziregi, Director for the Promotion and Dissemination of the Basque language of the Etxepare Basque Institute -who also made official meetings with various institutions throughout the day-,  Ibon Mendibelzua, Delegate of Euskadi in Mexico or the writer, translator and editor Héctor Orestes Aguilar, as well as members of the Basque community in Mexico and many readers of the author.

After the presentation, the chef Bruno Oteiza, owner of the Basque restaurant Biko,, one of the most important in Mexico, offered a cocktail in honor of Bernardo Atxaga on the terrace of the Palacio de Bellas Artes.

"The literature brings out the infinite universe of the human soul; it makes the readers feel more free or less alone," said the Basque writer Bernardo Atxaga during the talk he held along with the journalist Javier Aranda Luna on Wednesday afternoon in one of the main rooms of the Palacio de Bellas Artes  in Mexico City, which this year celebrates its 80th anniversary. The event, held on the International Day of Euskera, is part of the extensive program of activities to promote Basque literature organized this week in Mexico by the Etxepare Basque Institute, with the support of the Delegation of Euskadi in the country.

The journalist and literary critic Javier Aranda Luna accompanied the author´s reflections on his work. "My books arise primarily from my two territories: the Basque Country and the second half of the twentieth century" noted Atxaga, who agreed when Aranda suggested that "the country is carried on the tongue"; "Language is a rope in the dark," said the writer.

Javier Aranda said that in the author´s latest novel, ´Days of Nevada´ the recovery of memory is essential, and Atxaga recognized that recovery involves a huge risk, as the memory must be combined with the physical universe, which is dramatically different . "In mental space, the time can jump from one place to another, it transits, whereas the physical time is linear." The author noted that in this novel "one of the poetic focus has been the emergence of the monster in everyday life." The writer also said that in "Days of Nevada", in which he describes his own world, like a window into the interior, there are reflections that he pointed out already on his youth notebooks and also in the novel "Obabakoak" written nearly 30 years ago. He added that the personal perspective is the starting point not only for the writer, but also for  the reader: the social, economic and political context of each reader influences the approach to a work, hence the reception of the same literary work in each country is different.

The conference was attended by Mari Jose Olaziregi, Director for the Promotion and Dissemination of the Basque language of the Etxepare Basque Institute -who also made official meetings with various institutions throughout the day-,  Ibon Mendibelzua, Delegate of Euskadi in Mexico or the writer, translator and editor Héctor Orestes Aguilar, as well as members of the Basque community in Mexico and many readers of the author.

After the presentation, the chef Bruno Oteiza, owner of the Basque restaurant Biko,, one of the most important in Mexico, offered a cocktail in honor of Bernardo Atxaga on the terrace of the Palacio de Bellas Artes.

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