Luma: "each album paints a portrait of a certain time"

Euskara. Kultura. Mundura.

2017-10-10

Although they have only been around for two years, Luma have performed in almost every venue in their hometown, San Sebastian. This week, they began the performances that they will give throughout Spain as part of the "Artistas en Ruta" (Artists on the road) programme supported by the Etxepare Institute. Their shows will feature their new songs included in their last album, "Airwalk"Xabi and Adrián are the members of Luma, an up and coming Basque band that is quickly making a name for itself, so we wanted to find out more.

Although they have only been around for two years, Luma have performed in almost every venue in their hometown, San Sebastian. This week, they began the performances that they will give throughout Spain as part of the "Artistas en Ruta" (Artists on the road) programme supported by the Etxepare Institute. Their shows will feature their new songs included in their last album, "Airwalk". Xabi and Adrián are the members of Luma, an up and coming Basque band that is quickly making a name for itself, so we wanted to find out more.

 

You are a young group ... How did Luma get started in 2016?

We met outside the music scene. We both liked to skate and would see each other often in the skating park. Little by little, we began to share our passion for music and that’s how the band was born.

 

You debuted with the album "Club" and in 2017 released "Airwalk", a more professional piece of work that you’re presenting on this tour. How do you feel the group has evolved?

Each album paints a portrait of a certain time. Both are honest and will be around for a while. We like to respect our work and to be faithful to what we are experiencing or thinking. As we have been experimenting and learning, we’ve been able to better understand and direct our ideas towards a common goal. We feel this is the best way to work, so that’s what we’ll keep doing.

 

You’ve been part of the San Sebastian scene in festivals like Heineken Jazzaldia, Glad is the Day and Kutxa Kultur. How has that been?

We’ve always got our energy and ideas from the local scene and what we’ve been able to see here, in the local halls or gaztetxes (social centres). Rather than coming on strong, I’d say that we’ve given back some of what this scene has given us. It´s too bad there have been problems lately ... with the ban for the Bukowski hall, for example.

 

The tour also takes you outside the Basque Country. This weekend you performed in the Canary Islands (Spain), under the "Artistas en Ruta" programme, and next week you’ll be at Monkey Week in Seville. What does it mean for you to be part of these initiatives?

We’re lucky to be able to count on this type of support. Now we can consider traveling a little further afield and spreading our live music, the way that most defines us as a band.

 

Your career has crossed borders. You’ve just returned from Moscow, where you were with Belako and Niña Coyote eta Chico Tornado. In general, how do you see the influence of Basque music abroad?

The truth is that we don’t have much experience in this field, but in Moscow all three Basque groups were well received. In Tenerife (Spain) the people told us they were familiar with the Basque music scene.

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